‘You don’t buy clothes – you buy identity’

Today’s blog is examining fashion trends in my local area! I’ll be showcasing my research, drawing conclusions from my findings and explaining why this research is so important.

Some may view fashion as just a collection of fabrics with profit-making motives. A passage taken from ‘Art/Fashion in the 21st Century’ by Mitchell Oakley Smith and Alison Kubler claims that fashion is: “popularly understood to be fickle, transient and largely driven by popular culture.”

Trends certainly can be changeable and rapid. However, this is a crucial part of fashion if it is to fulfil all of its purposes. Components of art and fashion often work in collaboration to transmit an idea, much like a painting or sculpture. Society and its affairs are forever changing, so sometimes it is necessary for fashion trends to be fast – to record humanity’s proceedings accurately and provide an important artistic narration of society’s history. A quotation from artist Daphne Guinness supports this line of thinking in ‘Art/Fashion in the 21st Century’: “The best of our designers are indisputably artists; it just so happens that they have chosen fabric as their medium instead of paint or clay.”

Having said this, some trends seem to have staying power. Shoemaker and restorer Peters in Chesterfield (now also selling clothing) is a wonderful example of a trend that is here to stay. Their traditional approach to British craftsmanship seems to speak for a whole area of fashion, focused around protecting the humane element of design rather than the dis-passion of no human contact.

Clothing available in 'Peters' showroom

Clothing available in ‘Peters’ showroom

Ties available in 'Peters' showroom

Ties available in ‘Peters’ showroom

Shoes available at 'Peters' Chesterfield

Traditional craftsmanship

Traditional craftsmanship

Trends give the public an opportunity to represent the community’s values. For example, escapism is a healthy and welcome solution to the monotony of everyday life – clothing can liberate us from our usual personalities and the people we may feel we have to be. Costume designer Destiny Nickelson says that cosplay: allows us to transform into our favourite characters and escape reality.Clothes that are new and exciting and incite a reaction mean that daily routine has very little influence and the target customers’ craving for a fun retreat is listened to and solved.

These garments are wonderful examples. Unusual prints and shapes can paint a person in a lot of different and interesting lights.

Contrasting colours and fabrics.

Contrasting colours and fabrics.

Unusual scarf that has a lot to say. Continuous loop with a spine print.

Unusual scarf that has a lot to say. Continuous loop with a spine print.

In addition, clothing can be a form of self-expression and can aid in the development of self-esteem. Fashion can acknowledge this issue and honour it – it is an exciting and daring journey into the unknown. It provides a message of support for the wearer when taking the brave first few steps to overcome personal obstacles.

Blazer and slim fit jeans, often portrays independence and success.

Blazer and slim fit jeans, often portrays independence and success.

Slim fit cotton shirt with back feature. Enhances the waist, back and neck.

Slim fit cotton shirt with back feature. Enhances the waist, back and neck.

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